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A Guy's Moleskine Notebook

Thoughts and reflections on works of fiction and literature. Pondering of life through pictures and words. Babbling about gay rights. Travelogues and anecdotes.

  • [1] Annie Proulx: Brokeback Mountain
  • [2] Arthur Golden: Memoirs of a Geisha
  • [3] Yu Hua: To Live
  • [4] Alan Hollinghurst: The Line of Beauty
  • [5] Colm Toibin: The Master
  • [6] Carlos Ruiz Zafon: The Shadow of the Wind
  • [7] William James: The Varieties of Religious Experience
  • [8] Charles Higham: The Civilization of Angkor
  • [9] Graham Greene: A Burnt-Out Case
  • [10] Dai Sijie: Mr. Muo's Travelling Couch
  • [11] Alan Hollinghurst: The Swimming-Pool Library
  • [12] Mikhail Bulgakov: The Master and Margarita
  • [13] Colm Toibin: The Blackwater Lightship
  • [14] Alan Hollinghurst: The Folding Star
  • [15] Ross King: Michelangelo and the Pope's Ceiling
  • [16] Fyodor Dostoevsky: The Brothers Karamazov
  • [17] Jonathan Franzen: The Corrections
  • [18] Colm Toibin: The Story of the Night
  • [19] John Banville: Shroud
  • [20] Leo Tolstoy: Resurrection
  • [21] Peter Hessler: River Town, Two Years on the Yangtze
  • [22] Ian McEwan: The Atonement
  • [24] Gabriel Garcia Marquez: Love in the Time of Cholera
  • [25] Ignacio Padilla: Shadow without a Name
  • [26] Umberto Eco: The Name of the Rose
  • [27] Richard Russo: Straight Man
  • [28] Fyodor Dostoevsky: Notes from Underground
  • [29] Alan Hollinghurst: The Spell
  • [30] Hermann Broch: The Death of Virgil
  • [31] James Baldwin: Giovanni's Room
  • [32] Ken Kesey: One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest
  • [33] Xingjian Gao: One Man's Bible
  • [34] C. Jay Cox: Latter Days
  • [35] Harper Lee: To Kill A Mockingbird
  • [36] William Shakespeare: The Taming of the Shrew
  • [37] Daniel A. Helminiak: What The Bible Really Says about Homosexuality
  • [38] James Baldwin: Tell Me How Long the Train's Been Gone
  • [39] Kenji Yoshino: Covering - The Hidden Assault of Civil Rights
  • [40] Italo Calvino: If, On a Winter's Night A Traveler
  • [41] Arthur Phillips: The Egyptologist
  • [42] George Orwell: 1984
  • [43] Michael Warner: The Trouble with Normal: Sex, Politics, and Ethics of Queer Life
  • [44] Andrew Sullivan: Virtually Normal
  • [45] Henry James: The Wings of the Dove
  • [46] Jose Saramago: Blindness
  • [47] Umberto Eco: The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana
  • [48] Dan Brown: Da Vinci Code
  • [49] Kazuo Ishiguro: Never Let Me Go
  • [50] Ken Follett: The Pillars of Earth
  • [51] Leo Tolstoy: War and Peace
  • [52] Michael Thomas Ford: Alec Baldwin Doesn't Like Me
  • [53] Jonathan Franzen: How To Be Alone
  • [54] Jonathan Lethem: The Fortress of Solitude
  • [55] Matthew Pearl: The Dante Club
  • [56] Zadie Smith: White Teeth
  • [57] Fyodor Dostoevsky: The Double
  • [58] Jose Saramago: The Double
  • [59] Andrew Holleran: Dancer from the Dance
  • [60] Heinrich von Kleist: The Marquise of O & Other Stories
  • [61] Andrew Holleran: In September, the Light Changes
  • [62] Tom Perrotta: Little Children
  • March 29, 2006

     

    Bookmarks

    Bookmarks (A Reader's Guide to the Best in Books) is the newest magazine for bibliophiles in the market. Since its preview/debut issue in Summer 2002, Bookmarks has released 10 issues featuring a mixed bag of classics and contemporary authors like Steinbeck, Dickens, Garcia Marquez, Virginia Woolf, Waugh, Austen, Morrison, Naipaul, Potok, Faulkner, Potok, Vonnegut, and Philip Roth.

    The bi-monthly publication has book reviews and selections for readers of all ages. The "Book by Book" section will features a detailed coverage on works of a specific author, suggestions on introductory books to the author, a specific genre of literature, or a particular time period. The currents issue (May/June 2004) features Leo Tolstoy and Literary Voices of the Pre-Civil Rights Era, with a look at classic works by Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, and James Baldwin.

    More than half the pages of the magazine focus on navigating the ever-expanding sea of reading: new books, now-in-paperback books, and reader-favorite recommendations. This is by far the most useful and timesaving resource for me to search for my next reading selection. The "Selections" allows me to preview staff favorites from among the most highly rated books in an issue (usually 4 stars and above).

    The "New Book Guide" features book reviews separated into genres like spot, literary fiction, crime, sci-fi, general non-fiction, biography, history, science, and arts. It is therefore structured to find easily the information about a particular book most appealing and relevant to me. Each book featured in this section has a critical summary. The books covered fall into three basic categories: highly rated books that received many reviews, highly rated books that received less comprehensive coverage, and lower rated books that were widely reviewed and well-publicized. That way general popularity of the books, as well as the collective but disparaging critics may be accommodated. Highly rated books maybe balanced with the less publicized or lower-rated books. After all, it is frustrating to apply ratings to any works of literary arts in the absence of myriad choices. To accommodate such need, supplemental reading is provided.

    Bookmarks strives to accommodate palates readers of all ages and genres. In any given issue readers will find, in addition to the new releases and talk-of-the-town books that perch on bestseller list, works of classics. I find the inclusion on works of classics and their authors very appealing to me. Bookmarks has simply topped my favorite periodical list for the year and become my reading companion

    3 Comments:

    Anonymous iliana said...

    I love this magazine. Do you read Pages also?

    3/29/2006 7:59 PM  
    Blogger Greg said...

    Might be a good idea to pick up a copy. Thanks for the tip!

    3/30/2006 11:23 AM  
    Blogger Matt said...

    I read Pages although I don't have a subscription. It's less "serious" than Bookmarks in its choice of books. It recommends things like Danielle Steel and Anita Shreve....

    3/31/2006 1:00 PM  

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